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Watch: Hurricane-force law demolishes dream home like a popsicle stick project in the Houston metro area

WILLIS, Texas – Incredible video shows the moment last week’s derecho that crashed into the Houston metro overpowered a budding dream home.

Neighbors in Willis, Texas, facing the construction project, had the feeling that the structure of the three-story house would not be able to withstand the hurricane-force winds that were hitting the community.

“Oh, there you go,” neighbor Randy Dawson can be heard saying in the video to two other people. “It was, I told you so. I told you so. I told you that was going to happen.”

HOUSTON METRO SHOCKED BY 100 MPH RIGHT WHICH LEFT 7 DEAD AND MORE THAN 1 MILLION WITHOUT POWER

The house framed by the deadly gusts.
(Randy Dawson and Chastity White /TMX)

The first floor collapsed and the second on the way.
(Randy Dawson and Chastity White /TMX)

The third story falls to the ground.
(Randy Dawson and Chastity White /TMX)

Afterwards, the house looked like a pile of wood.
(Randy Dawson and Chastity White /TMX)

The two women accompanying him were surprised and repeated rounds of “My God.”

Each layer, starting from the bottom, begins to tilt and then collapse like dominoes in slow motion. The only thing left was a pile of wood that looked more like a kid’s failed popsicle stick project.

The backyard scene was equally shocking, literally. Lightning struck the lake right behind the house.

HOW TO WATCH FOX WEATHER

The derecho, a line of intense, widespread winds that traveled a great distance, left seven dead throughout the Houston metro. Winds of 90 to 100 mph knocked out windows of downtown skyscrapers. At the worst of the storm, more than a million customers were without power. Officials said it could be weeks before everyone regains power.

The transmission lines were also unable to withstand the Goliath winds.

WATCH IT: DEADLY STORMS HIT HOUSTON AS FIERCE WINDS LEAVE A DESTRUCTIVE PATH ACROSS THE SOUTH

File: Downed transmission power lines are shown near Grand Parkway and West Rd. after a storm on Thursday, May 16, 2024 in Cypress, Texas.
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File: Damage around Houston metro after strong storms
(Cy-Fair Fire Department).

File: Workers clear debris downtown on Monday, May 20, 2024, in Houston. The city closed streets in a six-block exclusion zone downtown, from McKinney to Polk and from Smith to Travis, as workers continued to clean broken glass from downtown streets and windows.
(Brett Coomer/Houston Chronicle)

File: A Houston police officer returns to his vehicle after removing people from a damaged tire store at the intersection of Sowden and Bingle after a severe storm.
(Logan Riely)

File: Damage left behind after severe thunderstorms hit Houston on May 16, 2024.
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File: A 31-year-old woman was killed when a tree fell on her vehicle on May 16, 2024.
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File: Broken and boarded windows are seen on the side of the Wells Fargo Plaza building in Houston, Texas, on May 17, 2024, a day after the National Weather Service warned of “severe” thunderstorms and possible tornadoes. Four people died in Texas on May 16 when severe storms with winds of up to 100 miles per hour hit the southwestern US state, local authorities said.
(Cécile CLOCHERET/AFP)