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Pennsylvania lawmakers say Harrisburg could lose Broad Street Market funding

The Harrisburg City Council’s decision to reject a contractor already chosen to rebuild the historic brick building on Broad Street Market could cost the state funding for the project. Video above: A drone shows the devastation at Pennsylvania’s historic burned market. Pennsylvania Rep. Patty Kim (D), 103rd District, and Rep. Dave Madsen (D), 104th District, wrote a letter to the council expressing their concerns. In the letter, the two state lawmakers say they are concerned that the delay their decision creates in the timeline for the market’s repair and eventual return could conflict with appropriations in the next state budget. “In particular, we are concerned that the failed vote has delayed reconstruction by three to five months, and with the next state budget expected to be approved in June, we cannot guarantee that appropriations will be awarded in this budget cycle,” it states. the letter. “We implore you to find a way to reconsider the vote or, depending on its importance, find a way to expedite a new selection process. Without a resolution, our options will be severely limited in budget discussions.” that representatives would contact council members individually to discuss the matter in more detail. Contractor rejected Last week, the council voted 5-2 to reject Alexander Building Construction. Council members, including Danielle Bowers and Jocelyn Rawls, cited “fairness issues” in the selection process to justify rejecting the contractor. The council also said the businesses chosen should better represent the city’s diversity. Harrisburg Mayor Wanda Williams was not happy with the council’s decision. In a statement, she said the company was chosen because it “earned the highest ratings from an independent scoring system that has awarded public projects for decades.” Williams also called the decision “reckless,” adding that it “means providers will have to wait.” even more time to return to their permanent home” and “city residents will see the one-year anniversary of the fire pass without any work being done.” Eric Hagarty, president of the Broad Street Market Alliance, also issued a statement, saying: “The council’s decision means the procurement process will have to be redone and reconstruction of the brick building will not begin for at least six months. This decision also comes a week before Broad Street Market’s new marquee is set to go up.” . opens with nine vendors from the original market. And all this happens as the first anniversary of the fire approaches, July 10.

The Harrisburg City Council’s decision to reject a contractor already chosen to rebuild the historic brick building on Broad Street Market could cost the city state funds for the project.

Video above: A drone shows the devastation at Pennsylvania’s historic burned market.

Pennsylvania Rep. Patty Kim (D), 103rd District, and Rep. Dave Madsen (D), 104th District, wrote a letter to the council expressing their concerns. In the letter, the two state lawmakers say they are concerned that the delay their decision creates in the timeline for the market’s repair and eventual return could conflict with appropriations in the next state budget.

“In particular, we are concerned that the failed vote has delayed reconstruction by three to five months, and with the next state budget expected to be approved in June, we cannot guarantee that appropriations will be awarded in this budget cycle,” it states. the letter. “We implore you to find a way to reconsider the vote or, depending on its importance, find a way to expedite a new selection process. Without a resolution, our options will be severely limited in budget discussions.”

The letter went on to say that representatives would contact council members individually to discuss the matter in more detail.

Rejected contractor

Last week, the council voted 5-2 to reject Alexander Building Construction.

Council members, including Danielle Bowers and Jocelyn Rawls, cited “fairness issues” in the selection process to justify rejecting the contractor. The city council also said the businesses chosen should better represent the city’s diversity.

Harrisburg Mayor Wanda Williams was not happy with the council’s decision. In a statement, she said the company was chosen because it “earned the highest ratings from an independent scoring system that has awarded public projects for decades.”

Williams also called the decision “reckless,” adding that it “means vendors will have to wait even longer to return to their permanent home” and “city residents will see the one-year anniversary of the fire come and go without any work being done.” . made.”

Eric Hagarty, president of the Broad Street Market Alliance, also issued a statement saying:

“The council’s decision means that the procurement process will have to be redone and reconstruction of the brick building will not begin for at least six months.”

This decision also comes a week before the new Broad Street Market tent opens with nine vendors from the original market.

And all this is happening as the first anniversary of the fire approaches, July 10.