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Rudy Giuliani pleads not guilty in Arizona ‘fake electors’ scheme at arraignment

Rudy Giuliani and several other defendants in the Arizona “fake electors” case have been indicted on charges of conspiracy, fraud and forgery over an alleged plot to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election in favor of Donald Trump.

The defendants appeared in court, in person and virtually, on Tuesday in Phoenix. Giuliani, who appeared without a lawyer, called and told the judge that he did not have a copy of the indictment, but that he had “general familiarity with the charges from reading it in the newspapers.” He pleaded not guilty.

Others indicted Tuesday include former Arizona Republican Party Chairwoman Kelli Ward and Christina Bobb, who served as an adviser to Trump’s 2020 campaign and is now an “election integrity” attorney for the Republican National Committee. . They all pleaded not guilty.

Giuliani, who appeared without a lawyer, called and told the judge that he did not have a copy of the indictment but that he had “general familiarity with the charges from reading it in the newspapers.”

Giuliani’s arraignment culminates an unnecessarily lengthy ordeal to begin the process against him. He and 17 other people were charged in the case in April, but Arizona authorities were unable to locate him to notify him.

They finally caught up with him on Friday night in Palm Beach, Florida, as he was leaving a celebration for his upcoming 80th birthday. Just hours earlier, Giuliani had mocked Arizona authorities and even livestreamed an episode of his YouTube show from his game.

Arizona Attorney General Kris Mayes told CNN on Monday night that Giuliani had led authorities to him.

“We found him essentially through his live streams; It’s not that hard to find,” Mayes said. “And so we did and our agents attended to him professionally after his birthday party, when the party was ending and he himself was leaving the house where he was.”

juliani wrote in a post on that he had learned that Arizona authorities were trying to find him only 24 hours before the notification was served and that he had “told them where he would be.”

At his arraignment, prosecutors refuted Giuliani’s claims about the allegation and told the judge how difficult it was to notify him. The judge set a $10,000 secured appearance bond for Giuliani and ordered him to report to the Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office for booking within 30 days.